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Very rare trompe-l'œil terrine in the form of a duck with the original stand

Strasbourg 1750–1754
Dimensions: duck: 36,5 cm long; stand: 44,8 cm long; total height: 36,8 cm
Model by Johann Wilhelm Lanz
Stand with painter's mark "R" in green = Johann Gottlieb Rothe

Description


The painter Johann G. Rothe (who decorated the other two known tureens, see below) previously worked in the Höchst manufactory. In the late autumn of 1748 (after he had dueled with Philipp Dann­höfer) he moved to Strasbourg – together with Christian Wilhelm von Löwen­finck (Reber p. 170, Bastian II p. 244 fig. 639). Shortly there­after followed his brother Adam Friedrich von Löwenfinck – one of the most influential porcelain painter in Europe.

Thus 1748 was an important year for the Strasbourg manufactory. With the arrival of the Löwenfinck brothers together with the painter Rothe and the start of work by the master modeller Johann Wilhelm Lanz, the heyday of Strasbourg begins with it’s unique Trompe-l‘œil tureens. These works are still considered the main pieces of European faience art.

The Strasbourg duck tureen with lid and original stand is extremely rare. Margret Ribbert (Historical Museum Basel 2018 p. 21) writes: ‘There are two basic types: On the one hand, the animals stand with their feet directly on the ground, on the other hand, they stand on a plant-covered base. In very rare cases it is placed on an additional overgrown stand.’ 

Comparative duck tureens with additional stand.
We are only aware of two further examples:

  • 1. Collection Ludwig, today Historical Museum Bamberg (cat. Bamberg no. 214, Ribbert 2018 p. 80)
    = Coll. Fribourg (Sotheby’s 15.10.1963 no. 383 and pictured on the cover)
    With painter’s mark ‘R’ in manganese. The Sotheby’s catalogue assumes in 1963 that this is ‘the only Strasbourg duck tureen recorded complete with it’s original stand.’
     
  • 2. Coll. Pflueger (II p. 106 f. and back cover) today Boston Museum of Fine Arts (Accession.-no. 2006.877a-c)
    With painter’s mark ‘R’. Hugo-Morley Fletcher, the author of the Pflueger catalogue, obviously did not knew the Fribourg duck. In 1993, he still guessed that the Pflueger duck was the only one with the ‘elaborate stand’
     

Literature


Reber, Horst und Ohlig, Stefanie Felicitas: Höchster Fayencen und Porzellane: Stiftung und Sammlung Kurt Bechtold. Mainz 2002

Bastian, Jacques: Strasbourg, faïences et porcelaines 1721-1784. 2 Volumes. 2002

Ribbert, Margret: Wildsau und Kopfsalat. Strassburger Fayencen des 18. Jahrhunderts in Basel. Historisches Museum Basel 2018

Morley-Fletcher, Hugo: Pflueger Collection - Early European Porcelain & Faience. 1993

Leprince, Camille: Gourmet Menagerie European and Chinese Ceramic Animals. Vandermeersch, Voltaire Antiquités, Paris 2016

Picture-gallery


Straßburger Trompe-l’œil Terrine in Entenform mit dazugehörigem Untersatz
  • Description

    The painter Johann G. Rothe (who decorated the other two known tureens, see below) previously worked in the Höchst manufactory. In the late autumn of 1748 (after he had dueled with Philipp Dann­höfer) he moved to Strasbourg – together with Christian Wilhelm von Löwen­finck (Reber p. 170, Bastian II p. 244 fig. 639). Shortly there­after followed his brother Adam Friedrich von Löwenfinck – one of the most influential porcelain painter in Europe.

    Thus 1748 was an important year for the Strasbourg manufactory. With the arrival of the Löwenfinck brothers together with the painter Rothe and the start of work by the master modeller Johann Wilhelm Lanz, the heyday of Strasbourg begins with it’s unique Trompe-l‘œil tureens. These works are still considered the main pieces of European faience art.

    The Strasbourg duck tureen with lid and original stand is extremely rare. Margret Ribbert (Historical Museum Basel 2018 p. 21) writes: ‘There are two basic types: On the one hand, the animals stand with their feet directly on the ground, on the other hand, they stand on a plant-covered base. In very rare cases it is placed on an additional overgrown stand.’ 

    Comparative duck tureens with additional stand.
    We are only aware of two further examples:

    • 1. Collection Ludwig, today Historical Museum Bamberg (cat. Bamberg no. 214, Ribbert 2018 p. 80)
      = Coll. Fribourg (Sotheby’s 15.10.1963 no. 383 and pictured on the cover)
      With painter’s mark ‘R’ in manganese. The Sotheby’s catalogue assumes in 1963 that this is ‘the only Strasbourg duck tureen recorded complete with it’s original stand.’
       
    • 2. Coll. Pflueger (II p. 106 f. and back cover) today Boston Museum of Fine Arts (Accession.-no. 2006.877a-c)
      With painter’s mark ‘R’. Hugo-Morley Fletcher, the author of the Pflueger catalogue, obviously did not knew the Fribourg duck. In 1993, he still guessed that the Pflueger duck was the only one with the ‘elaborate stand’
       
  • Literature

    Reber, Horst und Ohlig, Stefanie Felicitas: Höchster Fayencen und Porzellane: Stiftung und Sammlung Kurt Bechtold. Mainz 2002

    Bastian, Jacques: Strasbourg, faïences et porcelaines 1721-1784. 2 Volumes. 2002

    Ribbert, Margret: Wildsau und Kopfsalat. Strassburger Fayencen des 18. Jahrhunderts in Basel. Historisches Museum Basel 2018

    Morley-Fletcher, Hugo: Pflueger Collection - Early European Porcelain & Faience. 1993

    Leprince, Camille: Gourmet Menagerie European and Chinese Ceramic Animals. Vandermeersch, Voltaire Antiquités, Paris 2016

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